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Leg Lunge

Updated: Oct 12, 2020


When lunging horse: physically, remain steady as he remains fast. Mentally be steadfast



How to:


1. Drop belly button belt buckle low back

2. Sit shallow with crooked hips or knees

3. Unevenly weight feet, heavy in heels

4. Attach shoulders to the neck, hunched




Don't do:


1. Drop belly button belt buckle low back

2. Sit shallow with crooked hips or knees

3. Unevenly weight feet, heavy in heels

4. Attach shoulders to the neck, hunched



This pose has the same properties and principles as spur squat, with an added stretch. In the leg lunge we have to coordinate stepping back and staying balanced in a narrow stance. The stretching factor in this pose is great because our hip flexors tend to get really tight when we ride. Being in this position really reveals if our core is stable and developed enough, which allows us to work several parts of our body, as well as challenge our focus, balance and symmetrical mobility. Our hamstrings, glutes, and thighs are all connected and controlled from the pelvis and core. This pose is where we will find our habits of asymmetry will show. Sometimes our feet will be rocking back on the heels, or one foot will weigh heavier than the other. Our knees might want to bend in, or bend stiffly, and our ankles might not want to flex at all.

Ride and Apply:


When we ride it is common to need to make minor adjustments in our position, because of our horse's position. Occasionally to compensate for sudden movements and loss of balance, we clench or stiffen different parts of our body quickly. We might technically be seated deep in the saddle most of the time, but the micro-movements we make repetitively can cause tightness over time. We might also have to hold some relatively challenging asymmetrical postures as our horse figures some things out, which is another reason why having strength and balance practice is good!

Try it:


If you have a mirror do this near to evaluate what your upper body, torso, hips and feet are doing. Test to see how well your lower back and abdominals can 'stay friends' with out coming apart. Check your toes to see if they are facing in a straight line forward or pronating inward or pointing to the outside. See how well your hips stay level and straight, even as your leg comes back behind you. Now if you are taking your arms from your hips to raised above your head, make sure all the same principles of symmetry and engagement are present. Add kinesiology tape if you want extra 'input' to what your body is doing.




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